BLOGS

<i>The Social Network</i>: Click Here to Like This [Click]

Despite using Facebook on a daily basis, I have never once wondered how anybody came up with it, or why. And even though I've now seen The Social Network, I probably still don't know, but I still don't really care. All I know is that the story the movie tells -- from multiple viewpoints and in a constantly flashing-back fashion -- is about a socially maladjusted genius who could have gone one way in life and ended up a millionaire, but instead went another way and ended up a billionaire, albeit with two multi-million dollar lawsuits against him. And it's the most entertaining movie I've seen all year.

Director David Fincher is no slouch, and with this movie he has outdone himself. The story is engaging, jumping back and forth between a young Mark Zuckerberg alienating himself from half the Harvard campus as a student and a slightly less young Zuckerberg alienating himself from anyone within earshot at two separate settlement hearings with those who would lay claim to the Facebook fortune. Jesse Eisenberg is scarily in his element as a focused, self-centered computer whiz who responds to a bad break-up by developing a female-student rating program that's so misogynistically popular that it crashes Harvard's server. Eisenberg and writer Aaron Sorkin are a match made in heaven. The actor's rapid-fire delivery is well-suited to the writer's dense dialogue -- with anybody else speaking it, the movie would be twice as long, and probably half as funny.

Yes, in case you've been watching the trailers and think this is going to be a drama, it's actually as funny as it is sad. Sure, there are some tense confrontations, but there's also hilarious dialogue, and you have to laugh at the adult situations the college-age characters find themselves in, especially when they proceed to act like (or be treated like) kids. My favorite line is when Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, the crew-team twins whose code Zuckerberg may have used as a springboard for his own site, are debating whether or not to simply beat Zuckerberg up. Tyler: "I'm 6'5", 220 pounds, and there's two of me." (Accurate, since Armie Hammer plays both twins to indignant perfection.) Andrew Garfield (Never Let Me Go) is great in a completely different way as Zuckerberg's friend, not to mention the underwriter of the endeavor, although the latter ultimately proves to be the more important trait to all involved. And Justin Timberlake plays Napster founder Sean Parker as a paranoid, sleazy bastard, which should pleasantly surprise his fans and reassure the haters.

Critics are already talking Oscars in regards to this movie, and I have to agree. In fact, I may start a Facebook campaign.

Did you see it? Tell us what you thought below, then see how we thought the film could have been made more Fincher-appropriate.

Comments

SHARE THE SNARK

X

Get the most of your experience.
Share the Snark!

See content relevant to you based on what your friends are reading and watching.

Share your activity with your friends to Facebook's News Feed, Timeline and Ticker.

Stay in Control: Delete any item from your activity that you choose not to share.

MOST RECENT POSTS

BLOG ARCHIVES

Movies Without Pity

March 2014

6 ENTRIES

February 2014

7 ENTRIES

January 2014

6 ENTRIES

December 2013

12 ENTRIES

November 2013

14 ENTRIES

October 2013

12 ENTRIES

September 2013

8 ENTRIES

August 2013

9 ENTRIES

July 2013

11 ENTRIES

June 2013

12 ENTRIES

May 2013

9 ENTRIES

April 2013

8 ENTRIES

March 2013

16 ENTRIES

February 2013

8 ENTRIES

January 2013

6 ENTRIES

December 2012

11 ENTRIES

November 2012

12 ENTRIES

October 2012

11 ENTRIES

September 2012

10 ENTRIES

August 2012

13 ENTRIES

July 2012

6 ENTRIES

June 2012

10 ENTRIES

May 2012

9 ENTRIES

April 2012

11 ENTRIES

March 2012

14 ENTRIES

February 2012

8 ENTRIES

January 2012

6 ENTRIES

The Latest Activity On TwOP