Mondo Extra
Ask A Comic-Book Editor

Episode Report Card
Sars: A+ | Grade It Now!
YOU GRADE IT
"I Sometimes Feel I'm The Only Person In The Company Who Doesn't Actually Watch It"

Bunting: It's interesting to me to see a lot of graphic novels becoming movies and becoming TV series, and the fact that Cartoon Network and Adult Swim and so on give you different ways to tell stories -- what I know about comics wouldn't fill a bottle cap, but I'm interested to see how storytelling boundaries can be pushed with this.

Nybakken: One thing I've been saying for a couple years now is that some comics are basically the perfect movie pitch -- you basically walk into the studio movie executive and drop this on their desk and say, "Here's the movie." An example is 30 Days Of Night, which is now just opened -- when that came out, I don't remember the exact page count, it was like, either a 64- or a 96-page single all-in-one graphic novel, and I read it and I was like, you know, this is practically storyboards for the movie. Which is not to say that it wasn't an accomplished comic, because it was, but you read it and you're like -- you can see that it's a perfect movie pitch. Another one is a Vertigo comic that we did called WE3, which is the story of three housepets that are kidnapped by a shadowy military program and turned into cybernetic super-soldiers, and then they escape, and start to wreak havoc, and it's the perfect movie pitch! I read it and I was like, "Oh!" Especially what we can do with CGI now, you're just like, "Look, here's your movie, right there."

Manu: But what do you think about this trend of certain companies creating comic books for no other reason than to try to get them sold as movies? That seems to be degrading the comic book as a medium, it's using it, almost exploiting the medium just to catch an executive's eye. They're not interested in making great comics; they're just interested in making a sellable property.

Nybakken: But that's the case with anything, like, you know, I think in most cases that's going to fail, because if you don't have a lot of, like, actual passion or something interesting in the story, they're just gonna chuck it in the circular file along with all the bad scripts that they get. I don't really see that that's preventing people from doing comics -- if anything, I think it's going to encourage more good comics, because more people with talent are going to start doing this kind of thing basically as another route to get their stories into the movies.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12Next

Mondo Extra

Comments

Mondo Extra
Ask A Comic-Book Editor

Episode Report Card
Grade It Now!
YOU GRADE IT
"I Sometimes Feel I'm The Only Person In The Company Who Doesn't Actually Watch It"

Bunting: It's interesting to me to see a lot of graphic novels becoming movies and becoming TV series, and the fact that Cartoon Network and Adult Swim and so on give you different ways to tell stories -- what I know about comics wouldn't fill a bottle cap, but I'm interested to see how storytelling boundaries can be pushed with this.

Nybakken: One thing I've been saying for a couple years now is that some comics are basically the perfect movie pitch -- you basically walk into the studio movie executive and drop this on their desk and say, "Here's the movie." An example is 30 Days Of Night, which is now just opened -- when that came out, I don't remember the exact page count, it was like, either a 64- or a 96-page single all-in-one graphic novel, and I read it and I was like, you know, this is practically storyboards for the movie. Which is not to say that it wasn't an accomplished comic, because it was, but you read it and you're like -- you can see that it's a perfect movie pitch. Another one is a Vertigo comic that we did called WE3, which is the story of three housepets that are kidnapped by a shadowy military program and turned into cybernetic super-soldiers, and then they escape, and start to wreak havoc, and it's the perfect movie pitch! I read it and I was like, "Oh!" Especially what we can do with CGI now, you're just like, "Look, here's your movie, right there."

Manu: But what do you think about this trend of certain companies creating comic books for no other reason than to try to get them sold as movies? That seems to be degrading the comic book as a medium, it's using it, almost exploiting the medium just to catch an executive's eye. They're not interested in making great comics; they're just interested in making a sellable property.

Nybakken: But that's the case with anything, like, you know, I think in most cases that's going to fail, because if you don't have a lot of, like, actual passion or something interesting in the story, they're just gonna chuck it in the circular file along with all the bad scripts that they get. I don't really see that that's preventing people from doing comics -- if anything, I think it's going to encourage more good comics, because more people with talent are going to start doing this kind of thing basically as another route to get their stories into the movies.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12Next

Mondo Extra

Comments

SHARE THE SNARK

X

Get the most of your experience.
Share the Snark!

See content relevant to you based on what your friends are reading and watching.

Share your activity with your friends to Facebook's News Feed, Timeline and Ticker.

Stay in Control: Delete any item from your activity that you choose not to share.

The Latest Activity On TwOP