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"If I Had Babies To Sell, Who Knows?"

BM: [laughs] One of my guys, Aaron, just shot with Lauren Graham on Tuesday, and people showed up on the set, fans that were looking for her to talk to them. And they were like, "How on earth did you--?"

WC: Is that a problem that you've seen growing since you've been in the field -- the lack of privacy for actors?

BM: Not a problem in Canada; there really are walls between them and people getting to them. For the most part, the only way for them to get to an actor is to get to me first. And we don't give out private info. The actors that have their own websites and stuff, they have a separate email that's just for that website.

WC: They have an assistant or someone who reads that.

BM: Yeah.

WC: I mean, they don't! They totally read it all themselves.

BM: Oh, yeah!

WC: I know that your agency sometimes reps American actors for work in Canada. Talk a little bit about how that works -- what sorts of things an American actor would do in Canada.

BM: Say they had come up here to do something, and they went, "Oh, wow, Toronto's great -- I should totally move here!" Then they sort of split; they come back and forth. Or they marry a Canadian that they've met here, and we just try to get them work. For the most part, they don't really audition; we just sort of submit their name, and if they're interested and willing to pay their rate, it could happen, but that gets difficult, because if it's working with an American agency, or managers who've had them for a long time, they go, "Who are you and what do you want?" That kind of stuff. "We can get them work up there from here!" It gets a little dicey, and we don't do a lot of it. Mostly it's Canadians who've gone down to the States, and had success, but still want to have Canadian representation to do really great independent films, guest spots. We rep Dylan Neal and Jason Priestley and Michael Moriarty -- people who've gone down there and done well, but still want to have that here.

Speaking about Canadian clients going down to the U.S.: we are fortunate because, for the most part, casting people and producers really like Canadians. More often than not, they are better trained and have more experience. Most go to theatre school, and have had to do everything -- TV commercials, theatre, industrials, bad children's theatre --whereas their American peers may have had a couple days on a C.S.I. and a two-line part on Yes Dear. I remember when I was still an assistant how difficult it was to get the American casting people to watch a tape of auditions we had sent down. Now, we have casting people call us directly and ask to see specific clients for pilots and features, because they know our clients can really pull it off.

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Mondo Extra
Ask An Agent

Episode Report Card
Grade It Now!
YOU GRADE IT
"If I Had Babies To Sell, Who Knows?"

BM: [laughs] One of my guys, Aaron, just shot with Lauren Graham on Tuesday, and people showed up on the set, fans that were looking for her to talk to them. And they were like, "How on earth did you--?"

WC: Is that a problem that you've seen growing since you've been in the field -- the lack of privacy for actors?

BM: Not a problem in Canada; there really are walls between them and people getting to them. For the most part, the only way for them to get to an actor is to get to me first. And we don't give out private info. The actors that have their own websites and stuff, they have a separate email that's just for that website.

WC: They have an assistant or someone who reads that.

BM: Yeah.

WC: I mean, they don't! They totally read it all themselves.

BM: Oh, yeah!

WC: I know that your agency sometimes reps American actors for work in Canada. Talk a little bit about how that works -- what sorts of things an American actor would do in Canada.

BM: Say they had come up here to do something, and they went, "Oh, wow, Toronto's great -- I should totally move here!" Then they sort of split; they come back and forth. Or they marry a Canadian that they've met here, and we just try to get them work. For the most part, they don't really audition; we just sort of submit their name, and if they're interested and willing to pay their rate, it could happen, but that gets difficult, because if it's working with an American agency, or managers who've had them for a long time, they go, "Who are you and what do you want?" That kind of stuff. "We can get them work up there from here!" It gets a little dicey, and we don't do a lot of it. Mostly it's Canadians who've gone down to the States, and had success, but still want to have Canadian representation to do really great independent films, guest spots. We rep Dylan Neal and Jason Priestley and Michael Moriarty -- people who've gone down there and done well, but still want to have that here.

Speaking about Canadian clients going down to the U.S.: we are fortunate because, for the most part, casting people and producers really like Canadians. More often than not, they are better trained and have more experience. Most go to theatre school, and have had to do everything -- TV commercials, theatre, industrials, bad children's theatre --whereas their American peers may have had a couple days on a C.S.I. and a two-line part on Yes Dear. I remember when I was still an assistant how difficult it was to get the American casting people to watch a tape of auditions we had sent down. Now, we have casting people call us directly and ask to see specific clients for pilots and features, because they know our clients can really pull it off.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17Next

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