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"If I Had Babies To Sell, Who Knows?"

BM: I wouldn't tell someone to give up. I wouldn't do that. But I've dropped people that I've repped. It's not an easy thing, but if it's not working for some reason, so either it's me, or it's them, or the situation, and it's probably better if they go to another agency, and maybe that can work out. And I know of clients who've left our agency that sort of struggled, and within six months have gotten really great parts being with someone else, and vice versa -- people that have been with agents for three, four years, and then came here and within a couple of months started working regularly. You just don't know. So I would never tell someone "Give it up." Or "You're not good." It's "We're not working out." And you do see people that you know it's never going to work for them. But I can't be that person, to say that.

WC: Presumably if you know, when you meet them, that it's never going to work out for them, you wouldn't take them on in the first place.

BM: Exactly. Unless they're really hot. No, I'm kidding!

WC: When it happens that you sort of fire a client, or let them go, do they ever go to another person in your agency, or when they're done with The Characters, they're done with The Characters?

BM: No, we have clients that have moved around within the company, yeah. Basically, the theory here is that the company comes first, so what happens is whatever's best for the company. I have people that have come from other agents, and I've had people who have left me and gone to other agents. So, yeah, it's not a big deal. Once in a while, there's a little bit of tension about it, but it goes away.

WC: It's like at the hair salon when you have to change stylists.

BM: Oh my God. I could never!

WC: You just pretend you died, and go to another salon.

BM: Awkward, oh my God.

WC: It's too much!

BM: "I moved, didn't I tell you? To another country!"

WC: So once a person has gotten cast on a show -- they've gone through the process, they've gotten off the bus, they met you, you got them into a gig -- once they're past the job-getting phase, how does your role with regard to them change?

BM: Again, I think this is a difference between the American and the Canadian industry. Here, for the most part, you have to be a working actor. So...I don't want to say you have to take everything, but...you should take whatever comes along. Yes, you can start to do it where you go, "So after two years of doing these kinds of parts, we're no longer going to do tiny roles. It's going to be bigger and better parts." You kind of have to build that up to a place that you just get offers for parts, where you no longer even have to audition -- they have a great demo tape with all of their stuff, they get booked, and that's good enough. Whereas the Americans, they do that, really, from the start. You don't just take anything. That's the difference, compared to here. It's certainly changed, though, from what I understand from twenty years ago here, where it was, you just take whatever you can get. Even if you're a lead on a series, you take a two-line commercial; you just take whatever you can get. Now you can sort of build that up, just because we have the volume of production here. So you can say to people, "No, he just did this movie, and this was his rate, and we can't go less than that." You can do that now, a little more than you could before.

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Mondo Extra
Ask An Agent

Episode Report Card
Grade It Now!
YOU GRADE IT
"If I Had Babies To Sell, Who Knows?"

BM: I wouldn't tell someone to give up. I wouldn't do that. But I've dropped people that I've repped. It's not an easy thing, but if it's not working for some reason, so either it's me, or it's them, or the situation, and it's probably better if they go to another agency, and maybe that can work out. And I know of clients who've left our agency that sort of struggled, and within six months have gotten really great parts being with someone else, and vice versa -- people that have been with agents for three, four years, and then came here and within a couple of months started working regularly. You just don't know. So I would never tell someone "Give it up." Or "You're not good." It's "We're not working out." And you do see people that you know it's never going to work for them. But I can't be that person, to say that.

WC: Presumably if you know, when you meet them, that it's never going to work out for them, you wouldn't take them on in the first place.

BM: Exactly. Unless they're really hot. No, I'm kidding!

WC: When it happens that you sort of fire a client, or let them go, do they ever go to another person in your agency, or when they're done with The Characters, they're done with The Characters?

BM: No, we have clients that have moved around within the company, yeah. Basically, the theory here is that the company comes first, so what happens is whatever's best for the company. I have people that have come from other agents, and I've had people who have left me and gone to other agents. So, yeah, it's not a big deal. Once in a while, there's a little bit of tension about it, but it goes away.

WC: It's like at the hair salon when you have to change stylists.

BM: Oh my God. I could never!

WC: You just pretend you died, and go to another salon.

BM: Awkward, oh my God.

WC: It's too much!

BM: "I moved, didn't I tell you? To another country!"

WC: So once a person has gotten cast on a show -- they've gone through the process, they've gotten off the bus, they met you, you got them into a gig -- once they're past the job-getting phase, how does your role with regard to them change?

BM: Again, I think this is a difference between the American and the Canadian industry. Here, for the most part, you have to be a working actor. So...I don't want to say you have to take everything, but...you should take whatever comes along. Yes, you can start to do it where you go, "So after two years of doing these kinds of parts, we're no longer going to do tiny roles. It's going to be bigger and better parts." You kind of have to build that up to a place that you just get offers for parts, where you no longer even have to audition -- they have a great demo tape with all of their stuff, they get booked, and that's good enough. Whereas the Americans, they do that, really, from the start. You don't just take anything. That's the difference, compared to here. It's certainly changed, though, from what I understand from twenty years ago here, where it was, you just take whatever you can get. Even if you're a lead on a series, you take a two-line commercial; you just take whatever you can get. Now you can sort of build that up, just because we have the volume of production here. So you can say to people, "No, he just did this movie, and this was his rate, and we can't go less than that." You can do that now, a little more than you could before.

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