MONDO EXTRAS

Behind The Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Mork & Mindy

A title card tells us that we're in Golden Gate Park. Because the target demographic for an NBC Behind the Camera is fundamentally stupid (except, of course, for me and you), the card also tells us that we're in San Francisco. It's spring of 1976. I'm not too familiar with San Francisco geography, but there must be an insane asylum located in or near Golden Gate Park, because we hear the jabbering of an escaped inmate under the title card.

Eh, my mistake. It's not an inmate who escaped from the asylum. It's someone who should be in the asylum but has somehow managed to avoid it. More like a prescaped inmate. Whose name is Robin Williams. He's "performing" for an "audience" of "admiring fans." It's his usual high-speed, high-crap pastiche of this and that -- primarily some kind of "Elizabethan" dialogue with lots of "bawdy" references and little "Groucho Marx" asides. Oh, I'm sorry, I just had a little chat with my editor. Apparently, I'm being given a limited budget of sarcasm quotation marks. You'll just have to fill them in for yourselves. And I don't care how much high-speed transcription training I received from C.J. Cregg, I am not going to even attempt to transcribe Williams when he's "performing." (Sorry, I couldn't let that one go without comment.) In any case, while Williams is capering about in the park, there's this strange bullet-time zoom-in to him. Which I don't think the director should really be busting out, unless we're later going to get a scene of William and Pam Dawber dressed in black leather and tearing down the Machine. And I suspect that's not going to happen. And speaking of dress, Williams is wearing a long-sleeved red t-shirt, underneath some kind of combo Hawaiian/tie-dyed short-sleeved shirt, with rainbow suspenders, green khakis, and purple Converse high-tops. Of course, the audience isn't much better -- I haven't seen so many bell-bottoms and so much fringe since the all-Navy production of Annie Get Your Gun. Williams declares a ten-minute intermission, and the crowd disperses, but not before several people improbably put some money in his hat. One long-haired chick sticks around, and Williams starts calling her "Pookie" and chattering about the money he's made. She looks very happy until she sees a cop walking towards them and tries to pull Williams away. The cop demands to see his panhandling license, but lets him off the hook when it becomes clear that Robin is differently-abled. I just realized that the rainbow suspenders are covered with little pins. Robin's day-job must be as a greeter at TGIF's.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23Next

Comments

Behind The Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Mork & Mindy

A title card tells us that we're in Golden Gate Park. Because the target demographic for an NBC Behind the Camera is fundamentally stupid (except, of course, for me and you), the card also tells us that we're in San Francisco. It's spring of 1976. I'm not too familiar with San Francisco geography, but there must be an insane asylum located in or near Golden Gate Park, because we hear the jabbering of an escaped inmate under the title card.

Eh, my mistake. It's not an inmate who escaped from the asylum. It's someone who should be in the asylum but has somehow managed to avoid it. More like a prescaped inmate. Whose name is Robin Williams. He's "performing" for an "audience" of "admiring fans." It's his usual high-speed, high-crap pastiche of this and that -- primarily some kind of "Elizabethan" dialogue with lots of "bawdy" references and little "Groucho Marx" asides. Oh, I'm sorry, I just had a little chat with my editor. Apparently, I'm being given a limited budget of sarcasm quotation marks. You'll just have to fill them in for yourselves. And I don't care how much high-speed transcription training I received from C.J. Cregg, I am not going to even attempt to transcribe Williams when he's "performing." (Sorry, I couldn't let that one go without comment.) In any case, while Williams is capering about in the park, there's this strange bullet-time zoom-in to him. Which I don't think the director should really be busting out, unless we're later going to get a scene of William and Pam Dawber dressed in black leather and tearing down the Machine. And I suspect that's not going to happen. And speaking of dress, Williams is wearing a long-sleeved red t-shirt, underneath some kind of combo Hawaiian/tie-dyed short-sleeved shirt, with rainbow suspenders, green khakis, and purple Converse high-tops. Of course, the audience isn't much better -- I haven't seen so many bell-bottoms and so much fringe since the all-Navy production of Annie Get Your Gun. Williams declares a ten-minute intermission, and the crowd disperses, but not before several people improbably put some money in his hat. One long-haired chick sticks around, and Williams starts calling her "Pookie" and chattering about the money he's made. She looks very happy until she sees a cop walking towards them and tries to pull Williams away. The cop demands to see his panhandling license, but lets him off the hook when it becomes clear that Robin is differently-abled. I just realized that the rainbow suspenders are covered with little pins. Robin's day-job must be as a greeter at TGIF's.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23Next

Comments

SHARE THE SNARK

X

Get the most of your experience.
Share the Snark!

See content relevant to you based on what your friends are reading and watching.

Share your activity with your friends to Facebook's News Feed, Timeline and Ticker.

Stay in Control: Delete any item from your activity that you choose not to share.

The Latest Activity On TwOP