MONDO EXTRAS

Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Three’s Company

Actual Factual Joyce DeWitt sits in what looks like the old Siskel and Ebert movie-theater set, speaking earnestly into the camera, while the title -- the rather tongue-tying Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Three's Company -- appears in plain white letters in the bottom corner of the screen. Joyce explains to us that when Three's Company came on the air, a lot of people were watching you if you had the top-rated network comedy. Not like now, where shows like ER continue to get good ratings despite the fact that no one I know watches them. Incidentally, Joyce looks exactly like she did when she played Janet, only with a couple of extra wrinkles where her extremely dark eye makeup used to be. Joyce makes the point that "the show was a success because it was funny." Except for that one where Janet is a dancer, and her instructor hurts her feelings at the end, and then she and Jack slow-dance. Because that wasn't comedy -- that was real acting. She also reminds us that social mores have changed and stuff, because of course Three's Company was on before sex was available over the counter: back then, you had to get a prescription and swear out an affidavit that you wanted to have children, as you know. She quotes a very unquotable thing John Ritter once said about how they didn't just want to be funny; they wanted to be really funny, and if that is the most interesting thing John Ritter ever said about comedy, it's no wonder he never had another successful series, ever. Well, until that 8 Simple Rules For Reinvigorating My Wheezing Career thing, I guess, not that I've ever seen it. Anyway, you will want to keep in mind that Joyce was the only one of the three principals to be involved in the making of this movie. I smell objectivity roasting over the burning fire of Joyce's resentment -- let's watch!

Disco-funk-o-rama tunes play on the soundtrack as we bust through some wooden double doors and into a huge, sun-pounded office where we are told that it is October 1975, and two guys are trying to sell two other guys on a new TV comedy based on a British TV show. One of the pitch guys, whose name is Ted, explains over the bonka-wocka of the funk-twang soundtrack that in the show, the guy pretends to be gay so he can live with two girls. You know, it occurs to me that there are some premises that you really don't want to hear explained, because then you're just reminded of how lame they really are, and you can never enjoy them in quite the same way again. "Hold on!" says the CBS suit being pitched. "They're not married? They're living in sin? No thanks, gentlemen!" And then he returns, presumably, to his comfortable perch on the moral high ground, where network executives like to hang out when they're not planning new reality shows called Who Wants To Be Hog-Tied By A Rodeo Clown For Four Dollars?.

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Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Three’s Company Actual Factual Joyce DeWitt sits in what looks like the old Siskel and Ebert movie-theater set, speaking earnestly into the camera, while the title -- the rather tongue-tying Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Three's Company -- appears in plain white letters in the bottom corner of the screen. Joyce explains to us that when Three's Company came on the air, a lot of people were watching you if you had the top-rated network comedy. Not like now, where shows like ER continue to get good ratings despite the fact that no one I know watches them. Incidentally, Joyce looks exactly like she did when she played Janet, only with a couple of extra wrinkles where her extremely dark eye makeup used to be. Joyce makes the point that "the show was a success because it was funny." Except for that one where Janet is a dancer, and her instructor hurts her feelings at the end, and then she and Jack slow-dance. Because that wasn't comedy -- that was real acting. She also reminds us that social mores have changed and stuff, because of course Three's Company was on before sex was available over the counter: back then, you had to get a prescription and swear out an affidavit that you wanted to have children, as you know. She quotes a very unquotable thing John Ritter once said about how they didn't just want to be funny; they wanted to be really funny, and if that is the most interesting thing John Ritter ever said about comedy, it's no wonder he never had another successful series, ever. Well, until that 8 Simple Rules For Reinvigorating My Wheezing Career thing, I guess, not that I've ever seen it. Anyway, you will want to keep in mind that Joyce was the only one of the three principals to be involved in the making of this movie. I smell objectivity roasting over the burning fire of Joyce's resentment -- let's watch! Disco-funk-o-rama tunes play on the soundtrack as we bust through some wooden double doors and into a huge, sun-pounded office where we are told that it is October 1975, and two guys are trying to sell two other guys on a new TV comedy based on a British TV show. One of the pitch guys, whose name is Ted, explains over the bonka-wocka of the funk-twang soundtrack that in the show, the guy pretends to be gay so he can live with two girls. You know, it occurs to me that there are some premises that you really don't want to hear explained, because then you're just reminded of how lame they really are, and you can never enjoy them in quite the same way again. "Hold on!" says the CBS suit being pitched. "They're not married? They're living in sin? No thanks, gentlemen!" And then he returns, presumably, to his comfortable perch on the moral high ground, where network executives like to hang out when they're not planning new reality shows called Who Wants To Be Hog-Tied By A Rodeo Clown For Four Dollars?.

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