MONDO EXTRAS

Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Three’s Company

On April 2, 1981, Suzanne opens the door and picks up the newspaper, as the exceedingly well-chosen strains of Hall & Oates's "Rich Girl" play on the soundtrack. She sees in a headline that she has been fired from ABC. Alan comes up behind her to look. "It's over," she says, stunned. He insists that it's for the best. Onward to CBS!

In October of 1981, Suzanne is shooting what looks to be the worst pilot in the history of the universe, in which she plays a flight attendant. She is doing. The. Snort. Laugh. Good God. As she finishes the scene, there is yet another process server in her face. She handles the envelope warily.

Next, as the music continues, we see her and Alan stroll up a long hallway into the office of the CBS executive from earlier. He breaks the news that ABC is jealously guarding the character of Chrissy, and that they'll sue if the character on the new show resembles Chrissy in any way. Since CBS has no interest in doing anything with Suzanne in which she wouldn't basically play Chrissy, they've decided to pull the plug. Alan goes back into the "Suzanne created Chrissy" shtick, and CBS executive guy -- God bless him -- points out that this is actor bullshit, and that according to the writers' view of the world, characters are created by writers, not actors. Word. That could only have been better if he had pointed out that movies aren't generally written by directors. "Say money, money won't getcha too far, getcha too far...."

Switch to the Three's Company set, where they're celebrating 150 episodes. John is warming up for what appears to be a favorite trick. He takes the giant sheet cake in his hands, and then in a stunt that actually looks pretty impressive, he tosses the cake for a full flip in the air and catches it again. He sets the cake down as everyone cheers madly. Ted pulls John aside and tells him that they need to talk about something after the party, but he doesn't want John to tell the rest of the cast. Everyone else at the party continues with their hugging and whatnot. Man, that guy does look like he could be Ritter's long-lost kid.

Later, outside, Ted asks John if he feels like the creative spark has left the show. Instead of making the obvious joke -- which is something like, "Ha, ha, 'creative spark' -- good one" -- John waffles. Ted says he knows John has heard rumors of a possible spinoff, which John acknowledges he has. Ted tells him that it's for real -- the network wants to give him his own show at the end of Three's Company, which is apparently in the offing. Ted explains the premise of Three's a Crowd -- Jack will move in with his fiancée, and then he'll be at odds with her father. Ho-ho-ho, I can't wait to see it! I bet it'll run for years! John asks whether that means there's no place in the new show for Joyce, and Ted tells him yes, that's what it means. He also forbids John to talk to anybody (*cough* Joyce *cough*) about it until later. Ted promises to tell Joyce "when the time is right." John promises to teach Ted how to flip the cake, and then we see a very quick shot of John screwing up the cake flip and crashing it into the table, which they try to sell as some kind of subliminal thing, but which I suspect was an outtake they decided looked too cool not to use.

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Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Three’s Company On April 2, 1981, Suzanne opens the door and picks up the newspaper, as the exceedingly well-chosen strains of Hall & Oates's "Rich Girl" play on the soundtrack. She sees in a headline that she has been fired from ABC. Alan comes up behind her to look. "It's over," she says, stunned. He insists that it's for the best. Onward to CBS! In October of 1981, Suzanne is shooting what looks to be the worst pilot in the history of the universe, in which she plays a flight attendant. She is doing. The. Snort. Laugh. Good God. As she finishes the scene, there is yet another process server in her face. She handles the envelope warily. Next, as the music continues, we see her and Alan stroll up a long hallway into the office of the CBS executive from earlier. He breaks the news that ABC is jealously guarding the character of Chrissy, and that they'll sue if the character on the new show resembles Chrissy in any way. Since CBS has no interest in doing anything with Suzanne in which she wouldn't basically play Chrissy, they've decided to pull the plug. Alan goes back into the "Suzanne created Chrissy" shtick, and CBS executive guy -- God bless him -- points out that this is actor bullshit, and that according to the writers' view of the world, characters are created by writers, not actors. Word. That could only have been better if he had pointed out that movies aren't generally written by directors. "Say money, money won't getcha too far, getcha too far...." Switch to the Three's Company set, where they're celebrating 150 episodes. John is warming up for what appears to be a favorite trick. He takes the giant sheet cake in his hands, and then in a stunt that actually looks pretty impressive, he tosses the cake for a full flip in the air and catches it again. He sets the cake down as everyone cheers madly. Ted pulls John aside and tells him that they need to talk about something after the party, but he doesn't want John to tell the rest of the cast. Everyone else at the party continues with their hugging and whatnot. Man, that guy does look like he could be Ritter's long-lost kid. Later, outside, Ted asks John if he feels like the creative spark has left the show. Instead of making the obvious joke -- which is something like, "Ha, ha, 'creative spark' -- good one" -- John waffles. Ted says he knows John has heard rumors of a possible spinoff, which John acknowledges he has. Ted tells him that it's for real -- the network wants to give him his own show at the end of Three's Company, which is apparently in the offing. Ted explains the premise of Three's a Crowd -- Jack will move in with his fiancĂ©e, and then he'll be at odds with her father. Ho-ho-ho, I can't wait to see it! I bet it'll run for years! John asks whether that means there's no place in the new show for Joyce, and Ted tells him yes, that's what it means. He also forbids John to talk to anybody (*cough* Joyce *cough*) about it until later. Ted promises to tell Joyce "when the time is right." John promises to teach Ted how to flip the cake, and then we see a very quick shot of John screwing up the cake flip and crashing it into the table, which they try to sell as some kind of subliminal thing, but which I suspect was an outtake they decided looked too cool not to use.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26Next

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