MONDO EXTRAS

Judy With A "J"

by Kim February 26, 2001
Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows

On October 10, 1939, Judy got her star in the cement in front of Grauman's Chinese Theatre. We see faux newsreel footage of Judy whispering, "I made it, Papa" and pressing her hands into the cement while "Over The Rainbow" plays. Judy holds up her cement-covered hands for the photographers and giggles. Do you get the feeling that the good times aren't going to last for long?

Given Judy's struggles with prescription weight-loss drugs, do you think it was a good idea for Meridia to advertise during this movie? I think they might want to talk to their media buyer.

It's 1940. Judy and Mickey pull up in front of Ciro's, a restaurant. Judy jokes that she finally has Andy Hardy all to herself. Mickey comments, "Unless Betty Grable or Lana Turner show up," and then asks Judy to get a ride home with her "buddy, Artie Shaw" if Mickey gets a date. Judy says she doesn't mind, but obviously she does. They enter the restaurant, and we see a poster of Artie Shaw as the bandleader.

Judy is getting a ride home from Artie, and thanks him. Artie thanks her for singing a song with the band. Judy says that she can't sing, especially compared to Billie Holiday. Artie tells her that they're "band singers," and she's "a show singer." Judy complains about not being able to control her vibrato. Artie tells her that she becomes the song. Judy enthusiastically kisses him on the lips and then gets out, but not before telling him to call her, soon. Artie says that he will. Artie is, it must be said, devilishly handsome.

Judy runs inside and up the stairs. Ethel calls out to her, asking if she's going to say goodnight. Judy does. Mr. Gilmore appears, and after Judy leaves, complains that Judy doesn't like him, and hasn't accepted his and Ethel's marriage. They got married? Well, I guess this is how we find out. Mr. Gilmore also complains about the hours that Judy is keeping. He should complain about the fact that he feels the need to wear a three-piece suit to sit in his own house to watch television. Why so dressed up, dude? He walks back in the living room, and Ethel murmurs, "Neither do I. I'll have something to say about that." Ooh, she's evil.

Judy closes her dressing room door and leans against it with a sigh. She sits at her vanity and pops some pills. Arthur knocks at the door and enters. He tells Judy that Mayer wants to see her right away. Judy barely has time to eke out a panic-stricken, "Why?" before Mayer shows up at the door. He enters and tells Judy that she looks tired, and that he's heard about "all the carousing [she's] been up to," and that her mother called, concerned. Yeah, right. Concerned about her source of money, maybe. Judy tries to deflect Mayer's concern, but he says that Judy's been seen at Ciro's "almost every night." Judy says that she's just been hanging out with friends, but Mayer says that MGM pays Judy a lot of money, and that she owes it to them to maintain her image. Further, Mayer thinks that the twice-divorced Artie Shaw is too old for Judy. God, with her current hairstyle, this actress looks exactly like Judy Garland. Sorry, I got distracted for a minute. Mayer reminds Judy about the "morals clause" in her contract. Then he plays the father card, saying that her father would want her to stop "this friendship." Mayer concludes by saying that Judy has been "a bad girl," and he only keeps "people who behave." Judy cries as Mayer grabs her chin and says, "Don't break a father's heart." Oh, that's just wrong, playing the dead father card like that. Mayer leaves and Judy cries.

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Judy With A "J"

by Kim February 26, 2001
Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows On October 10, 1939, Judy got her star in the cement in front of Grauman's Chinese Theatre. We see faux newsreel footage of Judy whispering, "I made it, Papa" and pressing her hands into the cement while "Over The Rainbow" plays. Judy holds up her cement-covered hands for the photographers and giggles. Do you get the feeling that the good times aren't going to last for long? Given Judy's struggles with prescription weight-loss drugs, do you think it was a good idea for Meridia to advertise during this movie? I think they might want to talk to their media buyer. It's 1940. Judy and Mickey pull up in front of Ciro's, a restaurant. Judy jokes that she finally has Andy Hardy all to herself. Mickey comments, "Unless Betty Grable or Lana Turner show up," and then asks Judy to get a ride home with her "buddy, Artie Shaw" if Mickey gets a date. Judy says she doesn't mind, but obviously she does. They enter the restaurant, and we see a poster of Artie Shaw as the bandleader. Judy is getting a ride home from Artie, and thanks him. Artie thanks her for singing a song with the band. Judy says that she can't sing, especially compared to Billie Holiday. Artie tells her that they're "band singers," and she's "a show singer." Judy complains about not being able to control her vibrato. Artie tells her that she becomes the song. Judy enthusiastically kisses him on the lips and then gets out, but not before telling him to call her, soon. Artie says that he will. Artie is, it must be said, devilishly handsome. Judy runs inside and up the stairs. Ethel calls out to her, asking if she's going to say goodnight. Judy does. Mr. Gilmore appears, and after Judy leaves, complains that Judy doesn't like him, and hasn't accepted his and Ethel's marriage. They got married? Well, I guess this is how we find out. Mr. Gilmore also complains about the hours that Judy is keeping. He should complain about the fact that he feels the need to wear a three-piece suit to sit in his own house to watch television. Why so dressed up, dude? He walks back in the living room, and Ethel murmurs, "Neither do I. I'll have something to say about that." Ooh, she's evil. Judy closes her dressing room door and leans against it with a sigh. She sits at her vanity and pops some pills. Arthur knocks at the door and enters. He tells Judy that Mayer wants to see her right away. Judy barely has time to eke out a panic-stricken, "Why?" before Mayer shows up at the door. He enters and tells Judy that she looks tired, and that he's heard about "all the carousing [she's] been up to," and that her mother called, concerned. Yeah, right. Concerned about her source of money, maybe. Judy tries to deflect Mayer's concern, but he says that Judy's been seen at Ciro's "almost every night." Judy says that she's just been hanging out with friends, but Mayer says that MGM pays Judy a lot of money, and that she owes it to them to maintain her image. Further, Mayer thinks that the twice-divorced Artie Shaw is too old for Judy. God, with her current hairstyle, this actress looks exactly like Judy Garland. Sorry, I got distracted for a minute. Mayer reminds Judy about the "morals clause" in her contract. Then he plays the father card, saying that her father would want her to stop "this friendship." Mayer concludes by saying that Judy has been "a bad girl," and he only keeps "people who behave." Judy cries as Mayer grabs her chin and says, "Don't break a father's heart." Oh, that's just wrong, playing the dead father card like that. Mayer leaves and Judy cries.

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