MONDO EXTRAS

The One Where Monk Is Right

by admin September 25, 2005
Monk: “Mr. Monk and the Earthquake”

Okay, so when I found out I was one of the recappers doing a Tubey's Kids recap for the Hurricane Katrina donation drive, I sort of panicked. It was my week off from Rome, and I wanted to use the time to do an especially good job on this, but I didn't have a lot of time to think about what to recap. I had idly threatened to do The Star Wars Holiday Special from 1978, but it's about fourteen hours long and has about three minutes of commercials total (which naturally I would have recapped for sheer time-capsule value) and I didn't think I could get a copy of it in time anyway, since my friend who owns it is going to medical school in Vermont. So instead, I just went to the video store and picked out a DVD of a show I used to watch pretty regularly: Monk. I chose the episode I did for two reasons. One, it features Amy Sedaris, who all right-thinking people agree is awesome. And two, Monk faces a new challenge that I've dealt with myself a couple of times this past year. So this one was kind of close to my heart. It wasn't until later that I realized that maybe the natural disaster theme wasn't entirely appropriate. But I prefer to look at it this way: Hurricane Katrina has shown us the pain, misery, death, and devastation that a natural disaster can cause. But this hour of television shows that natural disasters can also be the source of wackiness. Join me, won't you?

A richly-appointed dining room. It actually looks like Donald Trump's place would look if wood paneling were more expensive than gold. A red-headed trophy wife sits sipping coffee and listening to some awful, bland, royalty-free nineties pop instrumental. A gray-haired gentleman in a suit comes in. They make tense small talk, then he glares at her creepily over the brim of his coffee cup. "I'm just adoring you," he lies. He picks up a remote control and turns down the rotten music. "You don't mind," he informs her when she complains. These two hate each other so much. I wonder which one of them is about to kill the other. He leaves, reminding her they're having dinner with a Father Hatcher again. Once he's gone, she spitefully blasts the music as loud as it will go. So loud, in fact, that the chandelier starts shaking, as does everything else in the room. Wow, that music's so bad it's actually causing an earthquake. Husband rushes back into the room and pulls her under the archway to the living room for safety. After a few seconds, the camera-shaking stops, and the husband says he thought "that might have been the big one." Over the sound of car alarms in the distant background, he tells the missus to turn on the news while he checks the house. He leaves again, and she looks down at a porcelain bust that has fallen to the floor without busting. She walks up to him where he's found a crack in the wall behind a huge, glass-fronted armoire, and brains him with the statue. But it still doesn't shatter, because it's made of polystyrene so the actress can actually lift it. She's left there holding it while he bleeds from a TV-friendly head wound on the floor. Just to be safe, she uses a handy fireplace poker to pry the armoire away from the wall and topple it over onto his face-down corpse. "Well, Henry," she quips, "That was the big one." Har dee har har.

I assume that if you're reading this, you already know the premise of this show, which is that Tony Shalhoub plays a former San Francisco police detective with a dead wife and a whole raft of tics and phobias that make it impossible for him to function without his faithful nurse/assistant/sidekick, brassy single mom Sharona (who was replaced in the third season by Traylor Howard, the female Ted McGinley, as Natalie), but uses his freakish eye for detail to solve cases that nobody else can. And if you didn't know the premise, you do now. Anyway, the aforementioned Sharona is walking down the street and bleating into her cell phone while fire engines race by, the firefighters on it wishing she would keep her voice down a little so they could hear their siren. A hydrant spurts behind her amid chaotic crowds. It's a pretty high-budget shot for this show, which is why it only lasts ten seconds. Anyway, she tells her kid Benjy to stay where he is, as she's on her way to check up on Monk first.

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The One Where Monk Is Right

by admin September 25, 2005
Monk: “Mr. Monk and the Earthquake”

Okay, so when I found out I was one of the recappers doing a Tubey's Kids recap for the Hurricane Katrina donation drive, I sort of panicked. It was my week off from Rome, and I wanted to use the time to do an especially good job on this, but I didn't have a lot of time to think about what to recap. I had idly threatened to do The Star Wars Holiday Special from 1978, but it's about fourteen hours long and has about three minutes of commercials total (which naturally I would have recapped for sheer time-capsule value) and I didn't think I could get a copy of it in time anyway, since my friend who owns it is going to medical school in Vermont. So instead, I just went to the video store and picked out a DVD of a show I used to watch pretty regularly: Monk. I chose the episode I did for two reasons. One, it features Amy Sedaris, who all right-thinking people agree is awesome. And two, Monk faces a new challenge that I've dealt with myself a couple of times this past year. So this one was kind of close to my heart. It wasn't until later that I realized that maybe the natural disaster theme wasn't entirely appropriate. But I prefer to look at it this way: Hurricane Katrina has shown us the pain, misery, death, and devastation that a natural disaster can cause. But this hour of television shows that natural disasters can also be the source of wackiness. Join me, won't you?

A richly-appointed dining room. It actually looks like Donald Trump's place would look if wood paneling were more expensive than gold. A red-headed trophy wife sits sipping coffee and listening to some awful, bland, royalty-free nineties pop instrumental. A gray-haired gentleman in a suit comes in. They make tense small talk, then he glares at her creepily over the brim of his coffee cup. "I'm just adoring you," he lies. He picks up a remote control and turns down the rotten music. "You don't mind," he informs her when she complains. These two hate each other so much. I wonder which one of them is about to kill the other. He leaves, reminding her they're having dinner with a Father Hatcher again. Once he's gone, she spitefully blasts the music as loud as it will go. So loud, in fact, that the chandelier starts shaking, as does everything else in the room. Wow, that music's so bad it's actually causing an earthquake. Husband rushes back into the room and pulls her under the archway to the living room for safety. After a few seconds, the camera-shaking stops, and the husband says he thought "that might have been the big one." Over the sound of car alarms in the distant background, he tells the missus to turn on the news while he checks the house. He leaves again, and she looks down at a porcelain bust that has fallen to the floor without busting. She walks up to him where he's found a crack in the wall behind a huge, glass-fronted armoire, and brains him with the statue. But it still doesn't shatter, because it's made of polystyrene so the actress can actually lift it. She's left there holding it while he bleeds from a TV-friendly head wound on the floor. Just to be safe, she uses a handy fireplace poker to pry the armoire away from the wall and topple it over onto his face-down corpse. "Well, Henry," she quips, "That was the big one." Har dee har har.

I assume that if you're reading this, you already know the premise of this show, which is that Tony Shalhoub plays a former San Francisco police detective with a dead wife and a whole raft of tics and phobias that make it impossible for him to function without his faithful nurse/assistant/sidekick, brassy single mom Sharona (who was replaced in the third season by Traylor Howard, the female Ted McGinley, as Natalie), but uses his freakish eye for detail to solve cases that nobody else can. And if you didn't know the premise, you do now. Anyway, the aforementioned Sharona is walking down the street and bleating into her cell phone while fire engines race by, the firefighters on it wishing she would keep her voice down a little so they could hear their siren. A hydrant spurts behind her amid chaotic crowds. It's a pretty high-budget shot for this show, which is why it only lasts ten seconds. Anyway, she tells her kid Benjy to stay where he is, as she's on her way to check up on Monk first.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13Next

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