MONDO EXTRAS

SAG on Strike

by admin September 18, 2000
SAG on Strike

This strike has been in a virtual standstill for several weeks, with the ad companies refusing to negotiate. SAG has gone so far as to ask that the strike end with a "business as usual" resolution, having both sides just pull their demands and go on as if there never was a strike. The ad companies refused that negotiation as well. They want SAG to fold, because then they get to have the studios and companies run their own agencies. They can pay actors as little as they'd like, keeping more money for themselves, for marketing, and to pay for more commercial air time.

The advertising industry has now moved on to smaller cities, like Austin or Toronto, and have been trying to tap into the (mostly) non-union talent pool, offering unheard-of sums of money for "chance of a lifetime" commercial gigs. ["The other consideration for filming in Toronto is that commercial actors who have yet to break in the U.S. may be members of ACTRA (the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television And Radio Artists), not SAG, and hence can work in commercials without technically breaking the strike." -- Wing Chun] Suddenly there is all of this work in these small towns, and a chance to do Miller Lite ads, car commercials, and all sorts of companies that they usually never get auditions for. The catch is that if the actor ever wants to be a member of SAG, he or she'd better not even audition. Working during a strike is bad news, and the actor that takes union work during a strike is pretty much signing away their chances for continual success. ["Whereas if you only ever plan to work in Canada, you might not care." -- Wing Chun] This business is much smaller than it looks, and one can't just do work assuming "no one will find out." He or she just might have signed onto the most successful commercial of the strike period.

So, non-union actors can't work, union actors can't work, and the ad execs are refusing to budge. And these are your average actors affected here. This isn't a strike involving anyone whose name you know. These are professional "Hey! It's That Guy!"s and "Hey, I know that voice"es. Your character actors -- the voice on the people mover, the girl on the commercial with the funny laugh -- these are the people who are going bankrupt, who are losing their agents when those agencies are going bankrupt because they can't hire their actors. This strike has already cost the city of Los Angeles over one hundred million dollars. And if you factor in the businesses that the entertainment industry supports -- the caterers, the supply stores, the rental companies -- you can throw in millions more.

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SAG on Strike

by admin September 18, 2000
SAG on Strike This strike has been in a virtual standstill for several weeks, with the ad companies refusing to negotiate. SAG has gone so far as to ask that the strike end with a "business as usual" resolution, having both sides just pull their demands and go on as if there never was a strike. The ad companies refused that negotiation as well. They want SAG to fold, because then they get to have the studios and companies run their own agencies. They can pay actors as little as they'd like, keeping more money for themselves, for marketing, and to pay for more commercial air time. The advertising industry has now moved on to smaller cities, like Austin or Toronto, and have been trying to tap into the (mostly) non-union talent pool, offering unheard-of sums of money for "chance of a lifetime" commercial gigs. ["The other consideration for filming in Toronto is that commercial actors who have yet to break in the U.S. may be members of ACTRA (the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television And Radio Artists), not SAG, and hence can work in commercials without technically breaking the strike." -- Wing Chun] Suddenly there is all of this work in these small towns, and a chance to do Miller Lite ads, car commercials, and all sorts of companies that they usually never get auditions for. The catch is that if the actor ever wants to be a member of SAG, he or she'd better not even audition. Working during a strike is bad news, and the actor that takes union work during a strike is pretty much signing away their chances for continual success. ["Whereas if you only ever plan to work in Canada, you might not care." -- Wing Chun] This business is much smaller than it looks, and one can't just do work assuming "no one will find out." He or she just might have signed onto the most successful commercial of the strike period. So, non-union actors can't work, union actors can't work, and the ad execs are refusing to budge. And these are your average actors affected here. This isn't a strike involving anyone whose name you know. These are professional "Hey! It's That Guy!"s and "Hey, I know that voice"es. Your character actors -- the voice on the people mover, the girl on the commercial with the funny laugh -- these are the people who are going bankrupt, who are losing their agents when those agencies are going bankrupt because they can't hire their actors. This strike has already cost the city of Los Angeles over one hundred million dollars. And if you factor in the businesses that the entertainment industry supports -- the caterers, the supply stores, the rental companies -- you can throw in millions more.

Previous 1 2 3 4Next

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