MONDO EXTRAS

The 70s, Part One

by Manimal April 29, 2000
The 70s, Part One

Stock footage of Black Panther news conferences, Watts, Black Power protests, Huey Newton, and so on. "Papa Was a Rolling Stone" plays in the background. Dexter, wearing a gas-jockey-type uniform, is at his aunt's house when the aunt's foxy neighbor Yolanda walks by. Dexter's aunt introduces them and Dexter is smitten. Phrases like "power to the people," and "I hear you, sister," are tossed around. "What's Going On" starts to play.

Stock footage of kids playing in the street and burned-out businesses as Dexter cruises through what I assume is Watts or South Central LA. Sadly enough, neither areas have changed that much since the '70s, economically or socially. Dexter stops by the Atlas movie theater, which is going out of business. Via some movie-geek talk, he and the old movie-theater owner bond and he agrees to sell Dexter the place. Dexter's voice-over narrates the postcard Byron reads about how Dexter cashed all his savings and borrowed money to buy the theater.

Next shot, Byron and Eileen in her twin bed, talking about their blissful future of kids, convertibles, and station wagons. Wendy the roommate bangs on the door and then enters, yelling about Eileen having to get up to go to the rally. Eileen and Byron hide in the closet when they hear the dorm mother coming. Eileen tries to change and Byron asks if she really wants to go to the rally; Eileen says she has to because they've all been bugging her to go. The chanting starts: "Women unite/out of the house/and out of the home," or something like that. Wendy yanks open the door and drags Eileen away from Byron.

"I Am Woman" plays. Stock footage of feminist gatherings, DC rallies, ERA banners, Gloria Steinem, et cetera. Eileen and her dorm are watching Gloria speak and Eileen looks entranced. Wendy shouts, "Right on." I want to shoot her.

Byron and a polished-looking woman (pastel suit, pearls, blow-dried hair, and enough glittery peach lip gloss to frost a cake) are trying to hail a cab. She snags one, and offers to share. Her hair and his fight for space in the cab, and I start to asphyxiate, just thinking about the Aqua Net fumes in the air the day they shot that scene. Hey, Byron? Markie Post's hair from Night Court called, and it got a better job offer. Dialogue. Byron's a law student, the polished-looking woman who I think is supposed to be a Hot Babe works on the hill (that's Capitol Hill, for you radio listeners). Byron gushes about how that's his dream job. Suddenly, like some weird scene from Fame -- but without any dancing, energy, or fun -- their cab is surrounded by anti-war protesters, and traffic comes to a halt. "War" plays. I'm glad NBC decided to go for the non-obvious music choices with this series. The anti-war protestors meet some war protesters and a heated battle ensues. The taxi finally breaks through and they drive away. Byron erupts into this kiss-ass pro-government speech, and we get a mini sociology/history lesson about the "hard-working" taxpayers, the "Silent Majority" or patriotic Americans who are finally making themselves heard. I would transcribe more of the dialogue, but I got totally distracted by the bags underneath Brad Rowe's eyes, since you could store bowling balls in them. Byron mutters, "It's not a big deal to you, you work on Capitol Hill, you get to fight for what's right every day." The woman, or rather, her lip gloss, murmurs, "Who says you can't?" and offers to take him out to lunch.

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The 70s, Part One

by Manimal April 29, 2000
The 70s, Part One Stock footage of Black Panther news conferences, Watts, Black Power protests, Huey Newton, and so on. "Papa Was a Rolling Stone" plays in the background. Dexter, wearing a gas-jockey-type uniform, is at his aunt's house when the aunt's foxy neighbor Yolanda walks by. Dexter's aunt introduces them and Dexter is smitten. Phrases like "power to the people," and "I hear you, sister," are tossed around. "What's Going On" starts to play. Stock footage of kids playing in the street and burned-out businesses as Dexter cruises through what I assume is Watts or South Central LA. Sadly enough, neither areas have changed that much since the '70s, economically or socially. Dexter stops by the Atlas movie theater, which is going out of business. Via some movie-geek talk, he and the old movie-theater owner bond and he agrees to sell Dexter the place. Dexter's voice-over narrates the postcard Byron reads about how Dexter cashed all his savings and borrowed money to buy the theater. Next shot, Byron and Eileen in her twin bed, talking about their blissful future of kids, convertibles, and station wagons. Wendy the roommate bangs on the door and then enters, yelling about Eileen having to get up to go to the rally. Eileen and Byron hide in the closet when they hear the dorm mother coming. Eileen tries to change and Byron asks if she really wants to go to the rally; Eileen says she has to because they've all been bugging her to go. The chanting starts: "Women unite/out of the house/and out of the home," or something like that. Wendy yanks open the door and drags Eileen away from Byron. "I Am Woman" plays. Stock footage of feminist gatherings, DC rallies, ERA banners, Gloria Steinem, et cetera. Eileen and her dorm are watching Gloria speak and Eileen looks entranced. Wendy shouts, "Right on." I want to shoot her. Byron and a polished-looking woman (pastel suit, pearls, blow-dried hair, and enough glittery peach lip gloss to frost a cake) are trying to hail a cab. She snags one, and offers to share. Her hair and his fight for space in the cab, and I start to asphyxiate, just thinking about the Aqua Net fumes in the air the day they shot that scene. Hey, Byron? Markie Post's hair from Night Court called, and it got a better job offer. Dialogue. Byron's a law student, the polished-looking woman who I think is supposed to be a Hot Babe works on the hill (that's Capitol Hill, for you radio listeners). Byron gushes about how that's his dream job. Suddenly, like some weird scene from Fame -- but without any dancing, energy, or fun -- their cab is surrounded by anti-war protesters, and traffic comes to a halt. "War" plays. I'm glad NBC decided to go for the non-obvious music choices with this series. The anti-war protestors meet some war protesters and a heated battle ensues. The taxi finally breaks through and they drive away. Byron erupts into this kiss-ass pro-government speech, and we get a mini sociology/history lesson about the "hard-working" taxpayers, the "Silent Majority" or patriotic Americans who are finally making themselves heard. I would transcribe more of the dialogue, but I got totally distracted by the bags underneath Brad Rowe's eyes, since you could store bowling balls in them. Byron mutters, "It's not a big deal to you, you work on Capitol Hill, you get to fight for what's right every day." The woman, or rather, her lip gloss, murmurs, "Who says you can't?" and offers to take him out to lunch.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14Next

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