MONDO EXTRAS

The 70s, Part Two

by Manimal April 30, 2000
The 70s, Part Two

Eileen at her father's house for Christmas dinner. Her father tells her he likes to cook, and Eileen makes a snotty wisecrack about how maybe he should've done the cooking. Then she tells him that her mom has a boyfriend. Her dad is very cool and says, no duh. Eileen is really a big shit. Her dad talks about how things were different back in the day, and times change. I keep hoping her dad will come out of the closet and thus segue into the Stonewall era of the seventies, but I guess NBC figures gay liberation is not a sweeps-week friendly topic.

Byron's dad films a Super-8 home movie of everyone and then barks at his wife, Ike Turner fashion, to make him a drink and hold the camera as he makes a speech about his kids and their fabulous careers. Byron throws a hissyfit when his dad talks about his contribution to the government. Byron gets all Catcher in the Rye and lambastes everyone for being phonies and then runs out. Christie runs after him, and he yells at her that all their parents care about is the appearance of a successful family, and that she should at least "be honest with herself" about the fact that they put all their hopes, dreams and expectations into him, while they just wanted her to look good, and she should get away from the family while she can. Boy, Byron sure is a self-absorbed prick.

Byron drives away, and pulls up to Eileen's father's house. He bursts out that Eileen should come away with him, that he was never better than when he was with her, and that they should get married. Whoa, no better way to make a woman feel loved then talk about how she's good for you, eh, Byron? Not surprisingly, Eileen rejects his pathetic ass, but tries to invite him in for Christmas. He gets all affronted and says, "I love you!" and then runs off.

"Good Times" plays as stock footage of the 1976 Independence Day celebrations roll by. Stock footage of the Ford and then the Carter inaugurations.

Eileen's ad agency. Eileen, wearing her Sophia Loren for Women eyewear, watches in horror as her boss takes credit for her ad idea. She confronts him later. He promises her the next art-director job that comes along. Eileen is placated.

"You Should Be Dancin'" by the Bee Gees plays. Christie, now a go-go girl, dances in her cage. Eileen wiggles up and tells Christie that they used her ad. Christie gets to say, "Dynamite," although, unfortunately, not the way Jimmy "J.J." Walker used to. Mr. Toupee, the guy that danced the Hustle with Eileen, oozes up and takes Eileen away. Apparently his name is Harry. How appropriate.

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The 70s, Part Two

by Manimal April 30, 2000
The 70s, Part Two Stock footage of Americans evacuating Saigon as the North Vietnamese enter. "Nights in White Satin" plays, and there's more stock footage of the official end of the Vietnam War. Byron is at the Atlas Theater and says hi to Dexter. Dexter snots, "Well, guess who came to dinner." Byron tries to be conciliatory. Dexter tells him they can't go back. Byron says he came out to see if they could rescue their friendship. Dexter says Byron just wanted to be let off the hook. Byron mumbles something about "being on the wrong side," and Dexter tells him he's a schmuck. Eileen at her father's house for Christmas dinner. Her father tells her he likes to cook, and Eileen makes a snotty wisecrack about how maybe he should've done the cooking. Then she tells him that her mom has a boyfriend. Her dad is very cool and says, no duh. Eileen is really a big shit. Her dad talks about how things were different back in the day, and times change. I keep hoping her dad will come out of the closet and thus segue into the Stonewall era of the seventies, but I guess NBC figures gay liberation is not a sweeps-week friendly topic. Byron's dad films a Super-8 home movie of everyone and then barks at his wife, Ike Turner fashion, to make him a drink and hold the camera as he makes a speech about his kids and their fabulous careers. Byron throws a hissyfit when his dad talks about his contribution to the government. Byron gets all Catcher in the Rye and lambastes everyone for being phonies and then runs out. Christie runs after him, and he yells at her that all their parents care about is the appearance of a successful family, and that she should at least "be honest with herself" about the fact that they put all their hopes, dreams and expectations into him, while they just wanted her to look good, and she should get away from the family while she can. Boy, Byron sure is a self-absorbed prick. Byron drives away, and pulls up to Eileen's father's house. He bursts out that Eileen should come away with him, that he was never better than when he was with her, and that they should get married. Whoa, no better way to make a woman feel loved then talk about how she's good for you, eh, Byron? Not surprisingly, Eileen rejects his pathetic ass, but tries to invite him in for Christmas. He gets all affronted and says, "I love you!" and then runs off. "Good Times" plays as stock footage of the 1976 Independence Day celebrations roll by. Stock footage of the Ford and then the Carter inaugurations.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9Next

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