Mondo Extra
The James Marsters Interview

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"I Almost Punched The Preacher, Man."

So up until this point, I can honestly say that I give myself some degree of credit (although said degree has varied) for getting every interview I've ever done for TWoP. That streak has now ended, although given the interviewee, I'm not exactly complaining. I'd like, on behalf of TWoP, to thank James's publicist Jenni, who was a total sweetheart in arranging this interview, and, of course, the man himself, the former star of Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Angel, who gave me about fifty minutes when we were scheduled for twenty. He's a real good and fun guy, folks, and here's what he had to say.

Couch Baron: You grew up in Modesto, a small inland town in Northern California.

James Marsters: Yeah. Good place to grow up. A lot of orchards and dirt roads.

CB: Nice. I see that you wanted to be an actor from a pretty young age.

JM: Yeah. From sixth grade.

CB: Did you eventually get a case of the small-town blues there? Were you dying to get out and pursue your dream?

JM: Uh...yeah! My father lived near San Francisco, and when I first saw San Francisco, I was like, I want to live in the city. I just liked that rhythm.

CB: Did you go to theater down there?

JM: Yeah, I went to ACT, which is a really good theater on Geary Street. Byron Jennings was sort of there, Michael Winters was there -- that was a great, great company. In fact, they were so good that when I went to Broadway, I was like, "You know what, this is okay." Not that great, actually.

CB: Really! San Francisco was better.

JM: Yeah! I saw two complete seasons on Broadway, and I was like, I'm not seeing it. And I finally kind of came to the conclusion that Broadway was a for-profit market, and therefore the direction had to be a little simpler. I would see plays where I'd seen them in a not-for-profit theater, and they were more complex -- the same plays, same scripts. Good actors, on Broadway, but it just was simplified because it was a different market -- they're not trying to make art. They're trying to make money, and they want to widen the audience, I guess.

CB: Interesting. Well, you've done some really serious, committed theatrical productions...

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Mondo Extra

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Mondo Extra
The James Marsters Interview

Episode Report Card
Grade It Now!
YOU GRADE IT
"I Almost Punched The Preacher, Man."

So up until this point, I can honestly say that I give myself some degree of credit (although said degree has varied) for getting every interview I've ever done for TWoP. That streak has now ended, although given the interviewee, I'm not exactly complaining. I'd like, on behalf of TWoP, to thank James's publicist Jenni, who was a total sweetheart in arranging this interview, and, of course, the man himself, the former star of Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Angel, who gave me about fifty minutes when we were scheduled for twenty. He's a real good and fun guy, folks, and here's what he had to say.

Couch Baron: You grew up in Modesto, a small inland town in Northern California.

James Marsters: Yeah. Good place to grow up. A lot of orchards and dirt roads.

CB: Nice. I see that you wanted to be an actor from a pretty young age.

JM: Yeah. From sixth grade.

CB: Did you eventually get a case of the small-town blues there? Were you dying to get out and pursue your dream?

JM: Uh...yeah! My father lived near San Francisco, and when I first saw San Francisco, I was like, I want to live in the city. I just liked that rhythm.

CB: Did you go to theater down there?

JM: Yeah, I went to ACT, which is a really good theater on Geary Street. Byron Jennings was sort of there, Michael Winters was there -- that was a great, great company. In fact, they were so good that when I went to Broadway, I was like, "You know what, this is okay." Not that great, actually.

CB: Really! San Francisco was better.

JM: Yeah! I saw two complete seasons on Broadway, and I was like, I'm not seeing it. And I finally kind of came to the conclusion that Broadway was a for-profit market, and therefore the direction had to be a little simpler. I would see plays where I'd seen them in a not-for-profit theater, and they were more complex -- the same plays, same scripts. Good actors, on Broadway, but it just was simplified because it was a different market -- they're not trying to make art. They're trying to make money, and they want to widen the audience, I guess.

CB: Interesting. Well, you've done some really serious, committed theatrical productions...

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14Next

Mondo Extra

Comments

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