MONDO EXTRAS

The Steve Sicherman Interview

WC: Wow.

SS: And you just think, "How many people would love to be in this position?" And that's when you think, "Wow, this is great." That's the best. As for the least fun...

WC: ...when it's not.

SS: The notes become laboured, and people get suspicious and start to feel-- You know, you do develop camaraderie with your shows. Again, every show is different, and every situation is different, but usually, after working so hard on a show with people, you start to develop relationships where you genuinely care about people, and the hard thing with production jobs is that, you know, the show gets cancelled, and suddenly you're out of work. And one of my shows, if it's starting to have a little trouble in the ratings, or if there's some other issue that could be a threat to it coming back, I start getting calls from writers, or directors or agents, or I'll be on the stage for a taping, and a PA or an actor or somebody'll sidle up to me. And it's always "What are you hearing? Are we going to be back? What are we doing?" And that's a bummer, because people have got mortgages to pay and kids to feed, and so when a show's not working, you feel for people on a personal level. And at the same time, from the studio and network perspective, people have invested a great deal of time and energy -- and money -- into the show, and you desperately want it to work. And if, for some reason, it's not working -- whether it's because the show just doesn't seem to be creatively working, or even if it's one of those situations where you feel good about the show but there's some question about whether it's doing well enough in the ratings or whatever else -- that's really, really frustrating. Like I said, a little piece of you feels like it's dying inside when the ratings come in. But anyway.

WC: Does that really ruin your whole day, if they're bad?

SS: It can! If it's just an abberration -- if a show has a bad night -- then you can kind of slough it off. "Oh well, we'll see next week." But if you start to see a pattern... Every once in a while, you'll see a show where, every week, it seems to be dropping. And sometimes I'll see it with other shows at other studios and I'll think to myself, "Thank God I'm not involved with that." But you'll look at it and you'll see that a show has dropped maybe a share point every week, and you see something like that and it's like watching somebody drown from far away.

WC: That's so sad!

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22Next

Comments

The Steve Sicherman Interview

WC: Wow.

SS: And you just think, "How many people would love to be in this position?" And that's when you think, "Wow, this is great." That's the best. As for the least fun...

WC: ...when it's not.

SS: The notes become laboured, and people get suspicious and start to feel-- You know, you do develop camaraderie with your shows. Again, every show is different, and every situation is different, but usually, after working so hard on a show with people, you start to develop relationships where you genuinely care about people, and the hard thing with production jobs is that, you know, the show gets cancelled, and suddenly you're out of work. And one of my shows, if it's starting to have a little trouble in the ratings, or if there's some other issue that could be a threat to it coming back, I start getting calls from writers, or directors or agents, or I'll be on the stage for a taping, and a PA or an actor or somebody'll sidle up to me. And it's always "What are you hearing? Are we going to be back? What are we doing?" And that's a bummer, because people have got mortgages to pay and kids to feed, and so when a show's not working, you feel for people on a personal level. And at the same time, from the studio and network perspective, people have invested a great deal of time and energy -- and money -- into the show, and you desperately want it to work. And if, for some reason, it's not working -- whether it's because the show just doesn't seem to be creatively working, or even if it's one of those situations where you feel good about the show but there's some question about whether it's doing well enough in the ratings or whatever else -- that's really, really frustrating. Like I said, a little piece of you feels like it's dying inside when the ratings come in. But anyway.

WC: Does that really ruin your whole day, if they're bad?

SS: It can! If it's just an abberration -- if a show has a bad night -- then you can kind of slough it off. "Oh well, we'll see next week." But if you start to see a pattern... Every once in a while, you'll see a show where, every week, it seems to be dropping. And sometimes I'll see it with other shows at other studios and I'll think to myself, "Thank God I'm not involved with that." But you'll look at it and you'll see that a show has dropped maybe a share point every week, and you see something like that and it's like watching somebody drown from far away.

WC: That's so sad!

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22Next

Comments

SHARE THE SNARK

X

Get the most of your experience.
Share the Snark!

See content relevant to you based on what your friends are reading and watching.

Share your activity with your friends to Facebook's News Feed, Timeline and Ticker.

Stay in Control: Delete any item from your activity that you choose not to share.

The Latest Activity On TwOP

SHARE THE SNARK

X

Get the most of your experience.
Share the Snark!

See content relevant to you based on what your friends are reading and watching.

Share your activity with your friends to Facebook's News Feed, Timeline and Ticker.

Stay in Control: Delete any item from your activity that you choose not to share.

The Latest Activity On TwOP