MONDO EXTRAS

The 2003-2004 Tubey Awards, Part Four

by The TWoP Staff August 12, 2004
The 2003-2004 Tubey Awards, Part Four

Angel
Angel's final season was chock full of memorable moments. Some good: Lindsey's return, Wesley's death, ghostly Luchadores, and the standoff in "Origin." Some not so good: Lindsey's hair, Lorne's Hulked-out id, Spike's inexplicable resurrection, and Angel's adventure on a Nazi submarine.

Nonetheless, the clear winner in this category is nearly any part of "Smile Time," where our hero was turned into a puppet while investigating a demonic children's show. Angel was never as comfortable with comedy as its sibling Buffy, but maybe they were saving up five years' worth of jokes for one burst of remarkable insanity. It's hard to pick a single moment out of an episode that includes abusive puppets, a puppet-Angel beating up Spike, David Fury as a perky Jim Henson-ish puppeteer, puppets that "bleed" stuffing, Lorne's reaction to seeing a werewolf-shredded Angel, and fiendishly catchy educational songs. But the power-shot of the MoG striding out of the office to do battle, with teeny puppet Angel leading them with a sword slung over his shoulders, sums it up as well as anything. It almost makes me wish for another season, just so I could see that shot in the credits and giggle every week. Almost.

Oh, that bit where everyone died in the finale was groovy, too. And did I mention Wesley's death? I did? Cool. -- Strega

The Apprentice
It's tempting to nab one of Assorama's many freak-outs as the highlight -- was it the racist pots and kettles? Or was it the malevolent building materials? Maybe it was that nutty Jessica Simpson. But to capture the truly bizarre spirit of this show and the self-important air adopted by many of its lunkheaded participants, look no further than the conversation between the batty Tammy and the even battier Carson Daly when Tammy and her teammates were trying to "negotiate" what Daly would donate to a charity auction. Tammy, fresh off the disappointing news that Daly could not provide access to Tiger Woods, excitedly said there might still be other options for a golf date: "What about a celebrity and you?" The coming together of idiocy, the skewering of celebrity culture, and the over-the-top antics of one of the show's weirdest contestants resulted in a moment that won't soon be forgotten. -- Miss Alli

The Bachelor
In an unmemorable season of things no one remembers, football-playing boozehound date-rapist asshole (other than that, I'm sure he was totally a nice guy) Jesse Palmer (except he also wasn't a very good football player) stuttered and tripped through his stint as The Bachelor. The problem with the most memorable moment of Season 167 (or whatever it was) was that the producers -- realizing the creative death of a show that was never real creative to begin with -- engineered the moment using editing, pinecones, pipe cleaners, and glue. The ousted Trish felt she was ousted wrongly, so she turned up magically at Jesse's hotel while he was on his date with some Southern girl. Mary Jane? Mary Lou? Mandy Jaye! That's it! I almost managed to rid my head of that name and replace it with something useful like the names of a few Middle Eastern countries, but...no go. -- Djb

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The 2003-2004 Tubey Awards, Part Four

by The TWoP Staff August 12, 2004
The 2003-2004 Tubey Awards, Part Four

Angel
Angel's final season was chock full of memorable moments. Some good: Lindsey's return, Wesley's death, ghostly Luchadores, and the standoff in "Origin." Some not so good: Lindsey's hair, Lorne's Hulked-out id, Spike's inexplicable resurrection, and Angel's adventure on a Nazi submarine.

Nonetheless, the clear winner in this category is nearly any part of "Smile Time," where our hero was turned into a puppet while investigating a demonic children's show. Angel was never as comfortable with comedy as its sibling Buffy, but maybe they were saving up five years' worth of jokes for one burst of remarkable insanity. It's hard to pick a single moment out of an episode that includes abusive puppets, a puppet-Angel beating up Spike, David Fury as a perky Jim Henson-ish puppeteer, puppets that "bleed" stuffing, Lorne's reaction to seeing a werewolf-shredded Angel, and fiendishly catchy educational songs. But the power-shot of the MoG striding out of the office to do battle, with teeny puppet Angel leading them with a sword slung over his shoulders, sums it up as well as anything. It almost makes me wish for another season, just so I could see that shot in the credits and giggle every week. Almost.

Oh, that bit where everyone died in the finale was groovy, too. And did I mention Wesley's death? I did? Cool. -- Strega

The Apprentice
It's tempting to nab one of Assorama's many freak-outs as the highlight -- was it the racist pots and kettles? Or was it the malevolent building materials? Maybe it was that nutty Jessica Simpson. But to capture the truly bizarre spirit of this show and the self-important air adopted by many of its lunkheaded participants, look no further than the conversation between the batty Tammy and the even battier Carson Daly when Tammy and her teammates were trying to "negotiate" what Daly would donate to a charity auction. Tammy, fresh off the disappointing news that Daly could not provide access to Tiger Woods, excitedly said there might still be other options for a golf date: "What about a celebrity and you?" The coming together of idiocy, the skewering of celebrity culture, and the over-the-top antics of one of the show's weirdest contestants resulted in a moment that won't soon be forgotten. -- Miss Alli

The Bachelor
In an unmemorable season of things no one remembers, football-playing boozehound date-rapist asshole (other than that, I'm sure he was totally a nice guy) Jesse Palmer (except he also wasn't a very good football player) stuttered and tripped through his stint as The Bachelor. The problem with the most memorable moment of Season 167 (or whatever it was) was that the producers -- realizing the creative death of a show that was never real creative to begin with -- engineered the moment using editing, pinecones, pipe cleaners, and glue. The ousted Trish felt she was ousted wrongly, so she turned up magically at Jesse's hotel while he was on his date with some Southern girl. Mary Jane? Mary Lou? Mandy Jaye! That's it! I almost managed to rid my head of that name and replace it with something useful like the names of a few Middle Eastern countries, but...no go. -- Djb

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11Next

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